!!> PDF ✬ Northwest Passage ✪ Author Kenneth Roberts – Varanus.us

Northwest PassageThe Story Of Major Robert Rogers Expedition To Wipe Out The Indian Town Of St Francis, And His Search For The Water Route To The Northwest Based On Rogers Own Accounts

!!> PDF ✬ Northwest Passage ✪ Author Kenneth Roberts – Varanus.us
  • Hardcover
  • Northwest Passage
  • Kenneth Roberts
  • English
  • 11 July 2018
  • 0385043317

    10 thoughts on “!!> PDF ✬ Northwest Passage ✪ Author Kenneth Roberts – Varanus.us


  1. says:

    Not being terribly familiar with North America, especially that of the wild days of the late 18th century, just before the American War of Independence, I read this book with an open atlas at my elbow This enabled me not only to read a ripping and entertaining yarn, or three, of adventures and endurance, but also learn lots about the geography and history of those times This alone gave me enormous satisfaction.The title is somewhat deceptive The Northwest Passage, as I understand it, was the Not being terribly familiar with North America, especially that of the wild days of the late 18th century, just before the American War of Independence, I read this book with an open atlas at my elbow This enabled me not only to read a ripping and entertaining yarn, or three, of adventures and endurance, but also learn lots about the geography and history of those times This alone gave me enormous satisfaction.The title is somewhat deceptive The Northwest Passage, as I understand it, was the elusive sea route past Hudson Bay, through the Arctic Ocean, to the Bering Strait, the Northeast Passage being the same route in reverse By contrast, the eponymous passage of this book is the land route up the Missouri and out through Oregon Further, while the middle part of the book deals with Major Rogers obsession with discovering this road, it is not the main focus of the story as much as it is the heroes, villains, wars, and politics of the period.The first part of the book was my favourite an epic tale, in the tradition of Tolkien and Shackleton, of a journey through hell and back The second part puts in perspective the political shenanigans of the British that were later to help trigger the revolt of the American colonists The third part is a denouement, telling a love story of the first person of the narrative, Langdon Towne, and his finding peace in a troubled continent.It was not only America that I learnedof, but Americans, too The idea that the British, as colonial masters, were bumbling idiots is familiar to me We could tell similar histories here in South Africa, as well as in India and elsewhere Americans excessive religiosity, the idea that they were chosen of God, parallels that of the Boers of South Africa in the early 19th century, who also sought to escape the clutches of British despotism and to find their own northeast passage Freedom continues today, as I see it, to be the touchstone of all things that Americans find precious, and this book explains why better than any other I d read I liked it


  2. says:

    I read Northwest Passage for the first time when I was ten and my mom picked it up at a garage sale I then proceeded to read everything else by Roberts I could find Why do I still believe the books still stack up so well over time First, Roberts was a historian and a rigorous one His command of history and detail is immense and complex Also, he does not present early American history as peopled only by noble settlers and bloodthirsty Indians and selfless leaders He portrays the good and ba I read Northwest Passage for the first time when I was ten and my mom picked it up at a garage sale I then proceeded to read everything else by Roberts I could find Why do I still believe the books still stack up so well over time First, Roberts was a historian and a rigorous one His command of history and detail is immense and complex Also, he does not present early American history as peopled only by noble settlers and bloodthirsty Indians and selfless leaders He portrays the good and bad in all those he writes of and captures and venality and corruption in war that are inseparable companions to bravery and decency These books were my real education in history and beat the pants off of the textbooks of the day Still do They made me love the United States because it IS such a product of good and bad There are other works by Roberts just as good, foremost among them the monumental Oliver Wiswell acomplete look at the Revolutionary War than most of that or this day The only slight dating is the romantic relationships and this is, at best, a minor quibble Read this book and discover an author you should knowabout


  3. says:

    I was very surprised to learn that the author had been one of the best journalists in America, before retiring in order to become a novelist The skills of journalism have since clearly changed for the worse I ve learnt to be very cautious when picking up a book written by a journalist of our present day.I found this book to be riveting reading which given the length of this novel is a good thing I was terribly disappointed when I discovered the film of the similar ish name dir Alfred Hitc I was very surprised to learn that the author had been one of the best journalists in America, before retiring in order to become a novelist The skills of journalism have since clearly changed for the worse I ve learnt to be very cautious when picking up a book written by a journalist of our present day.I found this book to be riveting reading which given the length of this novel is a good thing I was terribly disappointed when I discovered the film of the similar ish name dir Alfred Hitchcock was a completely different story I ve never before or since read a novel, let alone such a compelling and epic text, on the subject of unexplored America in the eighteenth century the Americans vs the Brits vs the French, all vs the native Indians who of course weren t Indian at all , which is where this novel triumphs by including a search for the mythical North West Passage.The narrative of this book is vivid sometimes uncomfortably, even horribly so That, I suppose, is the joy of really good historical fiction dusty bones talk, past lives, their hopes and fears come to life Best of all there is the absolutely natural feel of everyday life in very dangerous times completely irrational really because the reader cannot possibly know what life for the real life protagonists was really like Yet that doesn t matter one jot, because though fictional, the account of war, death and raw survival there can be no other rational reason for eating boiled eagle that this novel contains is so terrifically and compellingly believable


  4. says:

    So long ago I read this book, it was one book that I got as a gift when I was young that I truly enjoyed The story of Landon Towne and his little trip with Major Robert Rogers and the Rangers, would set the imagination of any young man on fire, as it did mine It later inspired me to track the story of Robert down and of course it takes a sad down turn as so many did Still this story of determination, courage, duty not to mention cruelty and madness is still a good one.


  5. says:

    I ve always been a nut about American Indians, reading almost everything in libraries from elementary school through high school Northwest Passage was one of my favorites as a teen, but I hadn t give it a thought inthan two score years until a lapsed friend and I reconnected for a New Year s drink It turned out he was an Indian aficionado, too, with the French and Indian War 1754 1763 being one of his specialties I was so stoked after I got home that I bought the book and plunged I ve always been a nut about American Indians, reading almost everything in libraries from elementary school through high school Northwest Passage was one of my favorites as a teen, but I hadn t give it a thought inthan two score years until a lapsed friend and I reconnected for a New Year s drink It turned out he was an Indian aficionado, too, with the French and Indian War 1754 1763 being one of his specialties I was so stoked after I got home that I bought the book and plunged right back in I loved the book the second time around, too.The dramatic focus are the events surrounding Major Robert Rogers Rangers raid on the village of St Francis along the St Lawrence River in early October of 1759 The Rangers precursors to today s US Army Rangers endured incredible hardships leading up to the attack, but nothing like the constant terror that accompanied being pursued and butchered, if caught by hundreds of French soldiers and Abenaki Indians bent on revenge after they found St Francis burned, winter food stores destroyed, and most inhabitants killed While fiction, the account given by our young hero Langdon Towne is rooted inor less accepted historical fact To borrow a phrase, this part of the book is a ripping yarn The historical Rogers and a handful of companions traveled over 200 miles in sixteen days across unmapped forests with little or no food Rogers will and perhaps cannibalism kept the party alive.Subsequently, Langdon Towne finds his heart broken by a woman and moves to London to establish himself as a portraitist to society types He re unites with Rogers and eventually they embark on the second great adventure of the book This fictional quasi biography of Rogers forces the book to stick almost to actual events, though the author livens them up with a variety of subplots involving the narrator and his ward Because the book is so well researched and written, I was able to surf the adrenaline wave of the St Francis raid down the long slope of the last three hundred plus pages I really enjoyed this book, but wonder if would even find a publisher today given its length and subject matter Note that the book was a bestseller when published in 1937, became a Hollywood movie with Spencer Tracy in the lead in 1940 and even made it onto the TV screen in 1958 59 as a series starring Buddy Ebsen


  6. says:

    Robert Rogers is not much talked about these days, and so far as I know was never taught in schools His name is inseparable from that curious time in American history, the mid 1700s, when we, a British colony, made war on France and native populations for possession of the continent Despite what the school books imply, it was never a given that Britain would control North America Until the American Revolution, hegemony on these shores was very much in doubt Rogers made it much less so Roger Robert Rogers is not much talked about these days, and so far as I know was never taught in schools His name is inseparable from that curious time in American history, the mid 1700s, when we, a British colony, made war on France and native populations for possession of the continent Despite what the school books imply, it was never a given that Britain would control North America Until the American Revolution, hegemony on these shores was very much in doubt Rogers made it much less so Rogers was good at fighting Despite the scorn of the British regulars who disdainfully became his colleagues, he pioneered a mode of warfare perfectly suited to the wilderness of northern New York and Canada He strengthened Great Britain s grasp here And he did it mostly by himself His tactics are still studied His outfit, The Rangers, is commemorated in name by the elite of the Army So what better treat could there be than this extremely readable novel, this historical fiction in the best sense, which puts a human face on a great but otherwise shadowy historical figure The story is fantastic in all its ups and downs, the characters can almost walk off the page And the picture of the American wilderness of those years is something everyone should see The opening half of the book a harrowing tale of wilderness survival against all odds has gone into the records as one of the greatest in American literature, all thetelling because true The figure of Rogers comes through as one of the great American leaders of the country s early history except, unfortunately for history students, Rogers wasn t technically American, though born in Massachusetts, and in fact took Britain s side in the revolution No matter It s time to dust off this classic from 1937 and give it the full appreciation that another classic from that year Gone With the Wind may have stolen from it


  7. says:

    This book gets very good from page 50 Supposedly the second book is not close but I heard similar complaints about Oliver Wiswell.The book is less predictable than his other titles but the best thus far is still Rabble in Arms.Usually, the lead is just a foil for the excellent supporting cast In this case the lead is his best so far Cap Huff makes a few cameos along with Benedict Arnold is the only Roberts character in three books.Heroes rise and fall in this book The love story is better de This book gets very good from page 50 Supposedly the second book is not close but I heard similar complaints about Oliver Wiswell.The book is less predictable than his other titles but the best thus far is still Rabble in Arms.Usually, the lead is just a foil for the excellent supporting cast In this case the lead is his best so far Cap Huff makes a few cameos along with Benedict Arnold is the only Roberts character in three books.Heroes rise and fall in this book The love story is better developed than in previous offerings One person who is really heroic is barely noticed unless you are carefully reading the book.The oft criticized second book is much better than advertised.It is an excellent experience and should be read first by Roberts fans


  8. says:

    Some time ago, I was curious as to the state of things in 1937 when I was born I wondered what people were reading in those days, that he was a lieutenant in the intelligence section of the WW I American Expeditionary Force Sibe Some time ago, I was curious as to the state of things in 1937 when I was born I wondered what people were reading in those days, learned that one of the bestsellers was this novel by Kenneth Roberts Never having heard of Roberts 1885 1957 , I Wikipedia ed him only to learn that he graduated from Cornell University, wrote two fight songs for them was a member of the Quill Dagger Society that he was a lieutenant in the intelligence section of the WW I American Expeditionary Force Siberia during the Russian Civil War instead of at the front in Europe that he was the first American journalist to cover the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch, Adolf Hitler s first attempt to take power that he d written 8 key historical novels in addition to manybooks that he d been a journalist, working for Saturday Evening Post and that he was born died in Kennebunk, Maine.There was one other fact I learned which set up an immediate mental prejudice against him, almost causing me not to even read this book Roberts wrote many magazine articles and a book during the period immediately following World War I that urged strong legal restrictions on immigration from eastern and southern Europe, and from Mexico, and warning of the dangers of immigration from places other than northwestern Europe He became a leading voice for stricter immigration laws, and testified before a congressional committee on the subject He wrote If America doesn t keep out the queer alien mongrelized people of Southern and Eastern Europe, her crop of citizens will eventually be dwarfed and mongrelized in turn That being said, I found this to be a truly engaging, fascinating novel Some elements of Roberts s writing seems a bit old school , but I never once lost interest throughout the whole 734 pages The language of his story flows beautifully The book is filled with interesting character studies British, American, Native American, etc For me, the most compatible character was the narrator, Langdon Towne, an artist as well as a sometime Roger s Ranger In many ways it s a thought provoking book, with human issues set in a mid 18th century period in the U.S England As a native of Ohio, this passage caught me eye early in the book The prize for which they colonists the British vs the French Indians struggled was one that aroused the cupidity of every king in Europe and the King of France and the King of England would gladly have sacrificed the life of every general in their employ if by do so they could win That prize was the ultimate ownership of the Ohio Valley, with its endless forests, fertile plains, tremendous rivers and wealth of furs the richest empire for which two nations ever contended


  9. says:

    I enjoyed Roberts writing style immensely the prose was rich and nuanced, it reminded me of Patrick O Brian However, the novel did not sit well with me it s really two books in one The first part deals with Robert Rogers St Francis raid our fictional protagonist joins Roger s Rangers on the eve of their raid on St Francis This tale is briskly told, conveying the dangers and hardships of the mission, weaving historical figures into the narrative and accurately as far as I can tell por I enjoyed Roberts writing style immensely the prose was rich and nuanced, it reminded me of Patrick O Brian However, the novel did not sit well with me it s really two books in one The first part deals with Robert Rogers St Francis raid our fictional protagonist joins Roger s Rangers on the eve of their raid on St Francis This tale is briskly told, conveying the dangers and hardships of the mission, weaving historical figures into the narrative and accurately as far as I can tell portraying the details of the mission In this first half 350 pages of the novel, author Roberts deftly explores tensions between the British regulars and their Provincial counterparts as well as portraying the ambivalent attitudes of both toward Native Americans All in all, the first half of the novel is a brisk, rousing historical adventure The book started to lose me in the second half, however The life of our fictional protagonist, Langdon Towne, continues to revolve around that of his former Captain, Robert Rogers, as Rogers life descends into a Dickensian drama Rogers attempts to parlay his military prowess into fame, fortune, and a personal empire in Britain s newly acquired Western territories Rogers is no match, however, for the politics and skullduggery of imperial management, as he deals with and runs afoul of people like Charles Townshend, Edmund Burke, Sir William Johnson, and Jeffrey Amherst Constantly scorning authority, the alcoholic, womanizing Rogers winds up in debtor s prison in London before returning to America to raise another Ranger contingent to fight the upstart American rebels This second part of the tale could have been told muchefficiently it was hampered by a contrived, melodramatic romance and repetitive ruminations on the relationships between Indians and whites in the Western territories I almost gave up on the second half of the book If readers find themselves losing interest after the first 350 pages, I d advise letting it go enjoy the tale of the St Francis raid, but you won t miss much by dropping the book after that


  10. says:

    The best fiction makes us think about ourselves in ways we haven t or ways we simply don t It is allegorical and turns a mirror onto our human foibles The best fiction makes us think without realizing that we re doing it.In finishing Northwest Passage I was struck by a pair of sentences written in the last five pages of the novel that seemed to jump out at me as representative of what this country has become.In the first, the character Ann Potter rails against King George s England, which she The best fiction makes us think about ourselves in ways we haven t or ways we simply don t It is allegorical and turns a mirror onto our human foibles The best fiction makes us think without realizing that we re doing it.In finishing Northwest Passage I was struck by a pair of sentences written in the last five pages of the novel that seemed to jump out at me as representative of what this country has become.In the first, the character Ann Potter rails against King George s England, which she refers to as this land where nobody gets anything except by the accident of birth or favoritism and where noblemen think less of the poor than they do of dogs We persistently believe in this country that a it is still true that anyone can attain anything regardless of what they are born into, and b that there is no such thing as privilege This is a pernicious myth If you have doubts about our noblemen, check YouTube for the video of Mitt Romney s derisive comments about the lower classes, or look back a few years on my feed where you will find a former student of mine argue that the poor should paytaxes than the rich because they useservices In a recent conversation on someone s wall, the argument was again made that the wealthy have to overcome just as much as the poor in order to make it I m not entirely certain how someone could make that argument with a straight face, but then we seem to have lost most of our capacity for rational, critical thought.At any rate, the second quote is from the character Cap Huff, who complains, Ain t that just like the English Wasting money on kings that ain t no good too em, starting wars they don t know how to finish, and paying all outdoors for things they don t know nothing about Sound familiar It seems as if we are rapidly becoming the very England of King George III that we fought so hard to free ourselves from

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