!!> Download ➽ Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism: Turning believers into non-believers and non-believers into believers ➸ Author Swami Achuthananda – Varanus.us

Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism: Turning believers into non-believers and non-believers into believersReligion Is The Opium Of The People, Said Karl Marx Many Centuries Ago For Than A Billion People Living In India And Abroad, Hinduism Is The Religion And A Way Of Life In This Book Swami Achuthananda Cracks Open The Opium Poppy Pods, Analyzes The Causes For Euphoria, And Comes Away With A Deeper Understanding Of The People And Their ReligionThis Is A Comprehensive Book On Hinduism It Tells You Why Hindus Do The Things They Do And Don T Written In A Casual Style, The Book Guides You Through The Fundamentals Of The Religion It Then Goes Further And Debunks A Number Of Long Standing Myths, Some Of Them Coming From The Academia Of All Places While Most Books Shy Away From Contentious Issues, This Book Plunges Headlong By Taking On Controversies, Like The Aryan Invasion Theory, Idol Worship, RISA Scholarship And Many In Fact One Third Of The Book Is Just On Controversies That You Rarely Find In Any Other Literature

!!> Download ➽ Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism: Turning believers into non-believers and non-believers into believers ➸ Author Swami Achuthananda – Varanus.us
  • Paperback
  • 220 pages
  • Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism: Turning believers into non-believers and non-believers into believers
  • Swami Achuthananda
  • English
  • 22 March 2017
  • 1481825526

    10 thoughts on “!!> Download ➽ Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism: Turning believers into non-believers and non-believers into believers ➸ Author Swami Achuthananda – Varanus.us


  1. says:

    Did you know That Hitler s concept of a pure Aryan Race was fatally flawed and based on inexact, prejudiced research That the Hindu caste system was abolished in 1949 You can join Hinduism even of you want to retain your atheism All paths lead to God There is no such thing as Sin or Hell And much, much, much These fascinating insights, and a host of others, are contained in this excellent and accessible book about the beliefs, history, social and geographical origin Did you know That Hitler s concept of a pure Aryan Race was fatally flawed and based on inexact, prejudiced research That the Hindu caste system was abolished in 1949 You can join Hinduism even of you want to retain your atheism All paths lead to God There is no such thing as Sin or Hell And much, much, much These fascinating insights, and a host of others, are contained in this excellent and accessible book about the beliefs, history, social and geographical origins and evolution of Hinduism I hesitate to call it a book about the Hindu religion , because Hinduism and its cousins Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism are as much philosophies as religions.The book s title reflects the polytheistic belief systems in Hindu tradition, and yet can still accommodate monotheism even atheism Pragmatic and ever evolving Science and the Big Bang Theory are even accommodated in this all embracing belief system The sophisticated, elusive principle at the heart of Hinduism is cosmic consciousness Is this eclecticism all too good to be true Well, there are sub divisions and traditionalists who reject modernist tenets Even Mahatma Gandhi was once refused permission to enter the great Hindu temple at Guruvayoor because he was accompanied by lower caste followers An ancient temple in Kerala still has at the entrance, a sign that reads Non Hindus not allowed.The book is written as a series of essays covering the Culture, Concepts and Controversies in Hinduism, and explores and explains complex ideas in simple, often conversational prose Sprinkled with human stories, parables and personal views and occasional peeves , the writing is always engaging and at times delightfully controversial There were moments when I wanted to leap up and pump the air with a balled fist and shout yes, yes, yes at other times shake my head and mutter No, no, no.This book isthan a primer it would make an excellent debating resource and is an invitation to further reading and learning You will get behind the myths and misunderstandings that prevail about reincarnation, many gods yet one god, yoga, etc.The essay on The Milk Miracle of 1995 strikes a balance between blind faith and scientific explanation, leavened with humour In fact, a gentle irony runs through many of the essays Contrast and Compare type discussions are used to open up and explain differences and similarities with other mass religions like Islam, Christianity, Judaism.Boxed quotes from historical and contemporary figures enrich and reflect the text e.g after the essay on The Search for Aryans , Margaret Attwood is quoted I hope that people will finally come to realize that there is only one race the human race and that we are all members of it Amen to that, I say.In conclusion, I think the author, Swami Achutahnandu, takes the reader on a journey of understanding that embraces Hindu history, belief systems, nature, and geographical even social mobility He does this like a friendly guide sincere, knowledgeable and serious Although he can get tetchy now and then especially so in the case of academics obsessed with Freudian psychoanalysis you always feel there is a twinkle in his eyes and a sense of shared humanity A first class read Namaste.http www.tombrysonwriter.wordpress.com


  2. says:

    I think the one word that can fully describe this book is beautiful Firstly, the cover is stunning, which made me instantly excited to begin reading the book Inside, the formatting and layout of the book are stylish yet simple fits the tone of the book very well And the writing the writing is absolutely beautiful Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism is filled with descriptive and creative word choices, which I think is a fair indicator of a good book in the spirituality and religion genre I think the one word that can fully describe this book is beautiful Firstly, the cover is stunning, which made me instantly excited to begin reading the book Inside, the formatting and layout of the book are stylish yet simple fits the tone of the book very well And the writing the writing is absolutely beautiful Many Many Many Gods of Hinduism is filled with descriptive and creative word choices, which I think is a fair indicator of a good book in the spirituality and religion genre.Short fables, stories, inspirational quotes, and personal accounts are intermixed with lessons on history, linguistics, political science, and theology This book is not just about Hinduism itself, but also about how it developed and evolved, was shaped and molded, as it interacted with other civilizations, languages, cultures, and religions and it continues to evolve today As a student of political science, I enjoyed this greatly As an agnostic who has dabbled with religious studies and theology, I was fascinated As someone who knew nothing about Hinduism, this was mesmerizing and informative I now have a new found appreciation for the religion, and it is rare that such a short book can inspire one to gain a new understanding of something that has been around for centuries.Humor is interspersed throughout Would you expect a Neil Armstrong reference in a book on Hinduism I didn t, but it s there but the humor is light and not heavy handed, and it helps to maintain some air of levity and openness to an often serious and weighty topic I very much enjoyed the fact that the chapters were all short, and the writing style was relatively terse and straightforward there was no overly complex, ultra academic writing here, which is often a big issue for me with non fiction books.I m a fairly critical reader and perhaps unfairly so for books in genres I don t normally read But honestly, I found very little to criticize about this book, which is a very rare thing for me A minor thing was that at times, I felt like I didn t have full control of my reading I never had a concrete sense of where the book was going, or a sense that I was progressing from point A to point B in an organized manner But I think this is also a testament to the author s ability to seamlessly take readers through each chapter, stopping for a little history here, a little lesson on scriptures there, and essentially wandering the realms of Hinduism Overall, highly recommended


  3. says:

    Most Hindus don t understand their religion The average Hindu knowsabout the rituals but less about the religion than he realizes This book has all the vital facts which every practicing Hindu must read People interested in knowingabout India s formation in the past few centuries.Best lines from the book The word Hinduism is only about 300 years old, even though the religion isthan five thousand years old.The word Hindu itself is actually a Persian word coined by Cyrus the Most Hindus don t understand their religion The average Hindu knowsabout the rituals but less about the religion than he realizes This book has all the vital facts which every practicing Hindu must read People interested in knowingabout India s formation in the past few centuries.Best lines from the book The word Hinduism is only about 300 years old, even though the religion isthan five thousand years old.The word Hindu itself is actually a Persian word coined by Cyrus the great in the 6th century BCE to describe people who lived beyond the river Sindhu now Indus , which was the eastern boundary of the ancient Persian empire.The Persians had a phonetic problem with the letter S , and could only say it as H Hence Sindhu became Hindu.The original term used to address the religious tradition of India was Sanatana Dharma From Sanskrit, this translates to eternal religion and is based on the natural laws that govern the cosmos.Overall, a great read


  4. says:

    This is a well researched book that the author has written with much passion The author writes in a clear easy to read style However, there are too many ideas and facts in this book for me to give an adequate review I feel that this is a worthwhile book to read because Hinduism is a major religion that most of us know little about The author states that one out of every six people around the world is an Indian who can trace their root to India He also states that 80% of all Indians throug This is a well researched book that the author has written with much passion The author writes in a clear easy to read style However, there are too many ideas and facts in this book for me to give an adequate review I feel that this is a worthwhile book to read because Hinduism is a major religion that most of us know little about The author states that one out of every six people around the world is an Indian who can trace their root to India He also states that 80% of all Indians throughout this planet are Hindus Hinduism is the oldest of the world s major religions He makes the case that Hinduism is a serious religion that needs to be understood as equally important as the Christian, Jewish and Islam s religions Moreover, the principles of Hinduism have over time spread throughout the world In fact, almost every American has practiced one of the key principles of Hinduism at least once in their lives, even if they did not know one of their life long principles came from Hinduism What goes around comes around Just about all us have heard or uttered the previous sentence at least once in our life while at work or some other location The author refers to this way of looking at life as Karma a word most of us have uttered at one point in our life while never knowing that Karma plays an integral part of Hinduism The author has stated The law of karma states that your thoughts, words, and actions good and bad circle back to determine your future Simply put, you are responsible for your own actions If you plant goodness, you will reap goodness, but if you plant evil, it will come back and hurt you It is the universal principle of cause and effect Karma is not an abstract philosophical thought it is a practical way of looking at life If you are a bad person, decent people don t want to form friendships with you The only people who will talk to you are other bad people Of course in the end bad people will do to you the same thing that you like to do to decent people.The author does a good job of contrasting and comparing Hinduism with the other major religions like Christianity and Islam The author makes the point I agree that the other two religions believe in proselytizing or securing converts Many times when these religions were introduced to native populations, they were accompanied by men with weapons As a contrast Hinduism not only didn t proselytize but for much of the history of the religion wouldn t accept you as a member of the Hindu religion if you weren t born a Hindu Today the author states, you can become a Hindu by adopting a Hindu name About the title the author writes that despite what westerners believe, the Hindu religion only has one God However, they also worship many different gods that are all manifestations of their one god Brahman I guess this is possible, but I have to wonder if sometimes people get caught up in their local god and think of the local god as the overall god One big exception would be the Hare Krishna sect This group was founded in New York City in 1966 a city that is the epic center of a country that excels at selling people anything This is in keeping with the author s point that in order to understand a religion you have to understand that religion in confluence with all the things that are brewing around that religion at its creation


  5. says:

    I loved this book for many many many reasons I knew very little almost nothing of Hinduism, and wasn t sure what to expect when I read this masterpiece I now have a new appreciation for the culture, history and the people When my wife comes home from her yoga class and says namaste, it has a new meaning to me now.The author does an incredible job putting together a complete resource for anyone that wants an entertaining wikipedia style reference book that dives into the complex, colourful I loved this book for many many many reasons I knew very little almost nothing of Hinduism, and wasn t sure what to expect when I read this masterpiece I now have a new appreciation for the culture, history and the people When my wife comes home from her yoga class and says namaste, it has a new meaning to me now.The author does an incredible job putting together a complete resource for anyone that wants an entertaining wikipedia style reference book that dives into the complex, colourful and entertaining history And his writing is impeccable Extremely eloquent and gets his thoughts out with few words a real craft perfected I would hope to see this book take off on , or other book sellers it is worthy of the widest popularity.Thanks for the education I knowtoday than I did three days ago, and am better for it What goes around comes around and yes, I haverespect for the call centres too


  6. says:

    I ve read the dummies book and the idiot s guide on Hinduism some time back Both are quite good, but none of them talks about the controversies as this book I believe that s the best part in this highly entertaining book.


  7. says:

    I am a bit conflicted about my feelings on this book My love for the first two thirds of the book had me talking to people about my interest and engagement with it as I devoured its contents, and then for the final third very disappointed in some very specific ways.The book began as a wonderful primer of Indian culture a collection of short, friendly nonfiction essays on the history of the people and one of the oldest and most culturally diverse countries on the planet With a light voice and I am a bit conflicted about my feelings on this book My love for the first two thirds of the book had me talking to people about my interest and engagement with it as I devoured its contents, and then for the final third very disappointed in some very specific ways.The book began as a wonderful primer of Indian culture a collection of short, friendly nonfiction essays on the history of the people and one of the oldest and most culturally diverse countries on the planet With a light voice and an approachable tone, Achuthananda takes the reader on a journey of discovery and enlightenment in some unfamiliar and very non common knowledge areas In the first part, it was about India and Indian Culture The second section was an introduction to the gods and religious aspects of Hinduism I learned a great deal from this very simple layman approach to a very long and colorful history They are really a collection of easily digestible columns that even made me do a little research about their origins as their quick, well structured approaches to the topics seemed to me to read as though they originated in a blog something that is very attractive in modern reading for many audiences One thing that I was left wanting as someone who has written a great deal of nonfiction myself was where some of the data originated and while all of it is interesting, there doesn t appear to be a bibliography or works cited for the edition of this piece that I read This makes the work a little less authoritative While this makes the text no less interesting in the first two parts, the change of tone, data, structure, and approach becomes problematic in the third The third part of the book was a conflicted, unfortunate addition in my opinion It seemed that the controversies section really had no place with the rest of the book after reading it Simply because of the nature of what was written, there was a great deal of subjective, emotional language and opinion that were based in facts but contained a lot of opinion While I understand that the author may have had a disagreement with the opinions in the controversies mentioned strictly in terms of the academics mentioned by name, I understand that many other people also did according to what little research I did as I read this book and he has every right to respond, I felt the way they were portrayed in the author s writing was uncalled in several very specific references that had nothing to do with their work but what appeared to me to have very negative connotations about their personal lives.In conclusion, while I enjoyed the first two sections heightening my own desire to learnabout Hinduism and visit India , the third I did not as it was significantlysubjective and contained some language and approaches to the subject matter that are easily controversial in their own right


  8. says:

    What s interesting is that as a Christian in present day America, one might not even really realize the amount of influence Hinduism has had on our culture and how it is not necessarily some strange foreign religion, but one that touches most of our lives whether we realize it or not From the popular practice of yoga, to the belief in karma thanks for fully explaining that, btw , it s funny to see that Hinduism isn t necessarily a culture that is over there but can be felt right here as we What s interesting is that as a Christian in present day America, one might not even really realize the amount of influence Hinduism has had on our culture and how it is not necessarily some strange foreign religion, but one that touches most of our lives whether we realize it or not From the popular practice of yoga, to the belief in karma thanks for fully explaining that, btw , it s funny to see that Hinduism isn t necessarily a culture that is over there but can be felt right here as well I need to say that I am confused by the title about the believers into non believers and vice versa but everything else was very good The ending seemed really abrupt though, and almost a little snarky Overall the message of the book was very informative and positive, although there were some times that the tone became tense and angry, which to me didn t add to the benefits of the book, and almost undermined it But in the end I took away a lot so for that it was a very good read I would recommend to others


  9. says:

    This book is not only about Hinduism, it s also about human perspective to something different We fear what we don t understand and this book in every respect, shows that we practice a lot of Hinduismthan we are willing to admit I love how the author put Hinduism into perspective through clear and simple language Prior to reading this book I can honestly admit I knew nothing about Hinduism other than limited information of Gandhi I amenlightened and informed about the different a This book is not only about Hinduism, it s also about human perspective to something different We fear what we don t understand and this book in every respect, shows that we practice a lot of Hinduismthan we are willing to admit I love how the author put Hinduism into perspective through clear and simple language Prior to reading this book I can honestly admit I knew nothing about Hinduism other than limited information of Gandhi I amenlightened and informed about the different aspects of this religion and I have grown an appreciation of the difference it represents It helps you to see Hinduism beyond the scope of famous philosophers who incorporated its teachings in their daily lives


  10. says:

    Rarely will you find a friendlier writing style Achuthananda addresses the reader as if he were a close friend.As an intro to Hinduism for someone who has read nothing whatsoever about the religion, the first third of the book should prove rewarding.The second third of the book delvesinto Hindu cosmology and theistic structure, which based on the book s title, I thought ALL the book would be about This middle section is certainly what I got the most out of.The third section is a sort of Rarely will you find a friendlier writing style Achuthananda addresses the reader as if he were a close friend.As an intro to Hinduism for someone who has read nothing whatsoever about the religion, the first third of the book should prove rewarding.The second third of the book delvesinto Hindu cosmology and theistic structure, which based on the book s title, I thought ALL the book would be about This middle section is certainly what I got the most out of.The third section is a sort of randomly chosen potpourri of controversies in Hinduism, which are essentially debate over who exactly Aryans are, and the author bemoaning Western academics who in his view unjustly superimpose sexual elements of psychoanalysis over both Hindu myths andmodern Eastern scholars in an effort to get published writing something controversial While it s a fascinating topic of discussion, why Achuthananda chooses to specifically respond to a handful of rather esoteric arguments in an introductory book is beyond me If I were a publisher trying to fill for space, I might have asked forchapters onHindu myths and gods

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