[Epub] ➝ Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed ➢ John F. Ross – Varanus.us

Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of SpeedThe Sensational True Story Of Eddie Rickenbacker, America S Greatest Flying AceAt The Turn Of The Twentieth Century Two New Technologies The Car And Airplane Took The Nation S Imagination By Storm As They Burst, Like Comets, Into American Life The Brave Souls That Leaped Into These Dangerous Contraptions And Pushed Them To Unexplored Extremes Became New American Heroes The Race Car Driver And The Flying AceNo Individual Did To Create And Intensify These Raw New Roles Than The Tall, Gangly Eddie Rickenbacker, Who Defied Death Over And Over With Such Courage And Pluck That A Generation Of Americans Came To Know His Face Better Than The President S The Son Of Poor, German Speaking Swiss Immigrants In Columbus, Ohio, Rickenbacker Overcame The Specter Of His Father S Violent Death, A Debilitating Handicap, And, Later, Accusations Of Being A German Spy, To Become The American Military Ace Of Aces In World War I And A Medal Of Honor Recipient He And His High Spirited, All Too Short Lived Pilot Comrades, Created A New Kind Of Aviation Warfare, As They Pushed Their Machines To The Edge Of Destruction And Often Over It Without Parachutes, Radios, Or Radar Enduring Courage Is The Electrifying Story Of The Beginning Of America S Love Affair With Speed And How One Man Above All The Rest Showed A Nation The Way Forward No Simple Daredevil, He Was An Innovator On The Racetrack, A Skilled Aerial Dualist And Squadron Commander, And Founder Of Eastern Air Lines Decades After His Heroics Against The Red Baron S Flying Circus, He Again Showed A War Weary Nation What It Took To Survive Against Nearly Insurmountable Odds When He And Seven Others Endured A Harrowing Three Week Ordeal Adrift Without Food Or Water In The Pacific During World War II For The First Time, Enduring Courage Peels Back The Layers Of Hero To Reveal The Man Himself With Impeccable Research And A Gripping Narrative, John F Ross Tells The Unforgettable Story Of A Man Who Pushed The Limits Of Speed, Endurance And Courage And Emerged As An American Legend

[Epub] ➝ Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed ➢ John F.  Ross – Varanus.us
  • Hardcover
  • 400 pages
  • Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed
  • John F. Ross
  • 10 October 2017
  • 1250033772

    10 thoughts on “[Epub] ➝ Enduring Courage: Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed ➢ John F. Ross – Varanus.us


  1. says:

    Enduring Courage by John F RossEddie took off on a lone sortie on his first full day of command Near Billy sous les Cotes, he found five Fokkers escorting a pair of reconnaissance two seaters Pulling out his signature elan, he climbed high between between them and the sun, then pitched headlong into an attack dive Most of the pilots he killed, said Chambers, never knew what hit them Out of the sun, a quick burst and gone That was Rickenbacker This is an excellent biography about three Enduring Courage by John F RossEddie took off on a lone sortie on his first full day of command Near Billy sous les Cotes, he found five Fokkers escorting a pair of reconnaissance two seaters Pulling out his signature elan, he climbed high between between them and the sun, then pitched headlong into an attack dive Most of the pilots he killed, said Chambers, never knew what hit them Out of the sun, a quick burst and gone That was Rickenbacker This is an excellent biography about three distinct periods of Eddie Rickenbacker s life as a young race car driver, WW1 ace, and WW2 aviation advisor There is little information on his early childhood, or the years between WW1 and WW2 or the twenty five years he lived beyond WW2 so this is not technically a cradle to grave biography The rest may be a spoiler to those who don t know the story Eddie Rickenbacker was born in Columbus Ohio in 1890 to Swiss immigrants Columbus was emerging as a center for automotive innovation, only behind Detroit and Flint As a young teen Eddie was fascinated with the mechanics of automobiles and he soon went to work for the Columbus Buggy Company which by the early 1900 s was building automobiles A few years later at the age of eighteen Eddie helped design a race car for the company and the following year he raced in the Indianapolis 500 becoming one of the top drivers in the emerging sport His car was sponsored by Firestone Tire and Rubber company, also based out of Columbus The young Eddie even served as a chauffeur for the multi millionaire Harvey Firestone on cross country promotional trips The rest of the first one hundred pages follow Eddie s story through the racing ranks The number of drivers, mechanicians driver assistants , and fans who died in these early races of the automobile era was astonishingly high There is a story that follows Eddie at a racing track where the owners decided to put gravel down instead of mud and how dangerous and painful it was for the drivers since they didn t have windshields racing along at speeds in excess of seventy miles an hour Finding a solution at the Indy 500 the owners put down bricks for the driving surface and there were rapid advancements to the cars such as rearview mirrors that did away with the need for an board mechanician or spotter The race car period of Eddie s life, as told in the book, highlighted a lot of genuine drama and was quite interesting by itself As often happens with adventurous souls, Eddie became fascinated with airplanes At the Iowa State Fair in 1914, he watched awestruck as Lincoln Beachey the most famous pilot of the day conducted aerobatics past the grandstands In 1916 while the war raged in Europe, Eddie was still a top driver traveled across the Atlantic to England to meet with his new employer, SunBeam, about race cars He was deported back to the United States as British customs officials were concerned he was a German spy largely based on his name and the fact that he many drawings of automobile parts This tweaked Eddie and by the time America declared war against Germany in March 1917, he developed a plan to recruit top race car drivers to become America s pilots in the war since there was a shortage His plan was accepted and he joined the Air Corps He began his journey in France that summer as George Patton s driver until the Aerodrome was completed in November and the drivers could train to be pilots The next one hundred pages of the book are the meat of the book and the best written We follow Eddie s rise to hero figure soaring above the front lines becoming America s ace The author does an excellent job of weaving the story beginning with Eddie s lack of training and near death experiences, his initial insecurities, the deaths of fellow pilots, his first kill and on to becoming one of the most decorated figures of WW1 Deadly as the experience was for most of the American pilots, we learn that Eddie s entire nascent 94th Aero Squadron were also fortunate in one respect They were often pitted against other inexperienced German fighter pilots In contrast during one intense period of 1917 while fighting the Red Baron, British pilots were only living, on average, two weeks On a side note, I was puzzled by how much money was invested during WW1 in aviation There were hundreds of thousands of troops in the various Air Corps France, U.S., Britain, and Germany From the best I can gather, while aviation did not play a major role in determining the outcome of the war, if one side had a major advantage the outcome would have almost certainly turned out differently.The last few chapters of the book follow Eddie in the WW2 effort Now in his forties and from the pictures looking much holder, he was still a well known national hero and owner of the Indy 500 racetrack and an aviation executive In 1941 in a flight to Atlanta, he was only one of four to survive an Eastern airlines crash outside Atlanta Eddie was just a passenger and later felt significant remorse after questioning the pilot s judgment but ultimately allowing him to continue the flight in the fog Eddie came away with significant damage to his legs The following year in late 1942 he is recruited by the War department to hand deliver a personal message to Douglas MacArthur The message was from George Marshall to tell MacArthur to cease his criticism of the Roosevelt administration MacArthur had recently escaped from Corregidor leaving his soldiers behind to endure the Bataan death march and had a personal interest to return that was causing problems for Marshall and Roosevelt Eddie was to hand deliver the message so that the Japanese could not intercept communications and find out there was trouble with the top brass Eddie was to travel by military plane, as a passenger, from Hawaii with other military officials hopscotching their way across Pacific islands As fate would have it, the B 17 that they flew had a problem with the directional equipment and the pilot overshot the refueling station, a small atoll in the middle of the Pacific and in trying to find the atoll they ran out of fuel The pilot somehow landed the plane in the ocean swells without killing the eight occupants and they quickly launched the three small life rafts with few provisions Incredibly this was Eddie s second plane crash in a year as a passenger, something he had avoided as a WW1 pilot While in the rafts in order to keep the men alive, Rickenbacker took on a mean persona Lord, how they learned to hate that man There were times when they would gladly have thrown him into the sea, granted the strength Somehow Eddie s stinging rebukes did not further deflate morale but instead stirred up such anger as to keep them focused on him, not on the unrelenting agony and proximity of a foul death I raged at them until they found reason, in the midst of their suffering, to live Unbeknownst to the crew, already two weeks lost at sea, the U.S Air Force gave up the search and declared the eight men dead Upon hearing the news, Eddie s wife traveled to Washington to meet with General Hap Arnold to convince him to continue the search After being browbeaten, Arnold agreed to continue the search for oneweek Meanwhile the men split the rafts up to increase their chance of being spotted despite Rickenbacker s protests In retrospect the others made the right decision, they probably would have died had they listened to Eddie Because nearly a week later the remaining seven men, one man Kaczmarczyk had succumbed to the elements, were rescued and towed 14 miles to a remote island They spent 24 days at sea The story ends here despite Rickenbacker living on for another forty years.4.5 stars This is the best book I have read about WW1 aviation and a consistent read Lindbergh by A Scott Berg and The Wright Brothers by David McCullough are two other biographies on famous aviators While they are probably better overall reads, Enduring Courage is the most exciting


  2. says:

    In the early part of the 20th century, Eddie Rickenbacker s name was on everyone s lips..initially he was an American sports hero in the new game of auto racing Mechanically talented and self taught, he studied the workings of automobiles and racing tactics which paid off as he won race after race Auto racing was extremely dangerous in those early days with no seat belts, helmets or other safety equipment and the death rate kept climbing but Rickenbacker knew no fear Then came a turning po In the early part of the 20th century, Eddie Rickenbacker s name was on everyone s lips..initially he was an American sports hero in the new game of auto racing Mechanically talented and self taught, he studied the workings of automobiles and racing tactics which paid off as he won race after race Auto racing was extremely dangerous in those early days with no seat belts, helmets or other safety equipment and the death rate kept climbing but Rickenbacker knew no fear Then came a turning point in his life for which he will always be remembered..WWI The use of airplanes was limited, mostly only for observation duties But Rickenbacker and several other farsighted men realized that air power was the future of warfare He immediately signed on at the infancy of a recognized segment of the military and went to Europe to change the role of a strong air based fighting force He became the Ace of Aces with 26 kills in only five months of active services.This book gives the reader a look at Rickenbacker as a not very likeable individual.coarse, profane, and argumentative But he also was not seeking fame or adulation he was only doing his job and his attitude, although sometimes unpleasant, drove him and his squadron to excellence The pilots of WWI were an elite group and were often from the upper classes of society while Eddie was an uneducated boy from Columbus, Ohio He was basically shunned by his squadron members until they realized that he had talents that they lacked.an understanding of the machine and ideas of how to survive a dogfight using methods previously not employed He might not always be liked but he was admired for his tenacity and apparent lack of fear He later admitted that there were times he was scared to death and often threw up upon landing The author addressed the life of Rickenbacker in a straightforward and honest manner and the book is a page turner, even though some of the prose gets a little purple at times Recommended


  3. says:

    Enduring Courage Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed gets 4 Stars from me but that is really my flying background influencing my view of the book Non pilots might find it lacking in some details and not telling a full story The book covers Eddie s difficult and challenging early life through the end of WWI Then it jumps to 1941 and Eddie s survival of a commercial plane crash, then quickly jumps to his secret mission from Hap Arnold to carry a message from Roosevelt Enduring Courage Ace Pilot Eddie Rickenbacker and the Dawn of the Age of Speed gets 4 Stars from me but that is really my flying background influencing my view of the book Non pilots might find it lacking in some details and not telling a full story The book covers Eddie s difficult and challenging early life through the end of WWI Then it jumps to 1941 and Eddie s survival of a commercial plane crash, then quickly jumps to his secret mission from Hap Arnold to carry a message from Roosevelt and Marshall to Gen Douglas MacArthur not a kudo message His plane crashes at sea after missing a small island refueling station and he leads the crew to survive 3 weeks at sea in small rafts.Rickenbacker s life spanned the start of the age of speed His early fame came from racing cars and this is a great part of the story What rapid progress is made in auto technology is told through Eddie s adventures in auto racing But the best part of the story is how Eddie becomes a pilot and what he had to do to get into the air Eddie is the uncouth mechanic who can fix anything among a bunch of upper class Yale, Harvard, Princeton snobs who comprise the early group of WWI pilots This is another amazing story of perseverance How Eddie teaches himself to fly is truly incredible.Wanted to readabout air combat in WWI but will have to look elsewhere Plenty of fighting going on and you will learn about many of the famous pilots Lufbery, Udet, Richthofen, Mitchell, etc A decent look at one of the most famous aces


  4. says:

    Eddie Rickenbacker was born in 1891, just 5 years before my grandfather, and I ve always regretted that I never asked my grandpa about what it was like when he first saw a horseless carriage or an airplane, but the descriptions from this book describe some of Eddie s experiences which I imagine to be somewhat similar to what his must have been, and that made it all worthwhile for me.More than that, though, Rickenbacker was a pretty incredible guy I knew he was a heroic fighter pilot in World Eddie Rickenbacker was born in 1891, just 5 years before my grandfather, and I ve always regretted that I never asked my grandpa about what it was like when he first saw a horseless carriage or an airplane, but the descriptions from this book describe some of Eddie s experiences which I imagine to be somewhat similar to what his must have been, and that made it all worthwhile for me.More than that, though, Rickenbacker was a pretty incredible guy I knew he was a heroic fighter pilot in World War I and that he raced cars, but I didn t know he was a champion race car driver usually driving American built cars against what were then superior cars from Europe In fact, he was one of the first to race at the Indianapolis Speedway in the first of the Indy 500 races He was also successful as a businessman after the war, first as an executive and then owner of Eastern Airlines He had his failures, too his Rickenbacker car company couldn t compete with established companies, and when it closed down, he was 250,000 in debt But he refused to declare himself insolvent and eventually repaid his debts, which I found very admirable And, of course, he also spent several weeks lost at sea during World War II, and his survival of that ordeal later inspired Louis Zamperini the former Olympian of Unbroken fame to survive a similar fate, and his leadership although somewhat harsh toward his raft mates helped the other survivors to not give up.That s what was most inspiring to me his indomitable spirit When he saw something, he went after it and figured out a way to make it happen and didn t allow anyone to tell him something was impossible, and there are few attributesdistinctly American than that


  5. says:

    I am giving this book three stars Maybe it should be four but while the book was good and a well handled treatment of Rickenbacker I was left with the feeling that there was something missing I do not know what it was but there was a lacking I read this book on the recommendation of a GR friend and for that recommendation I am grateful Maybe in the course of writing this review and reflecting on the book I will discover the answer to my query Now what I did enjoy in this book is discovering I am giving this book three stars Maybe it should be four but while the book was good and a well handled treatment of Rickenbacker I was left with the feeling that there was something missing I do not know what it was but there was a lacking I read this book on the recommendation of a GR friend and for that recommendation I am grateful Maybe in the course of writing this review and reflecting on the book I will discover the answer to my query Now what I did enjoy in this book is discovering that before Rickenbacker was a flyer he was a race car driver of significance In fact what was most enjoyable about this book was reading about the advent of both automotive and aviation technology Rickenbacker was there at the beginning of both of these modes of transport and reading about their evolution was fascinating Of course I was also taken with the facts of Eddie s early life around the turn of the 20th century Comparing childhoods like Eddie s to what kids today live like is shocking in their differences The hardships are striking and it is easy to admire anybody that survived life as harsh as Eddie s The author seems to attribute Eddie s survival to his unique ability to endure That may be true but it may also be that he was just lucky All biographies that depict the harsh childhoods of their subjects tend to glamorize the subject s ability to survive but none of them ever detail how miraculous survival was in the time being discussed For every Eddie that survived there were how many that did not How much was attributable to the individual and how much was just luck Well I guess a discussion like that would diminish the character of the biography s subject and Eddie was definitely a survivor What I was also interested in learning was how inept military leadership was in both WWI and WWII They were either inept or very indifferent to the safety of service people they were responsible for leading I take this opinion after reading about how cavalier they were regarding safety In WWI the brass refused to purchase parachutes for the pilots of these cloth and wood contraptions called aeroplanes The brass thought the pilots might be too quick to use these escape devices and thus let an expensive airplane crash unnecessarily Consequently, a lot of early pilots died unnecessarily In WWII aviation technology had improved significantly but protocols and safety apparently hadn t The near tragic comedy of errors responsible for Eddie and the crew of the B17 that he was on crashing into the Pacific and without the minimal supplies of an emergency kit is incredible If this is an example of the leadership in the Air Force then Pearl Harbor is a bit easier to understand and makes our victory in that wara tribute to the citizen soldiers and sailors than to the knuckleheads that lead them.The author closes with an epilogue that discusses Eddie s courage, heroism, and tenacity, his endurance What is interesting to me here is that Eddie was truly a hero in its true meaning We live in an era when the title of hero is too easily used Every kid that enlists in the military is immediately honored with the title of hero simply for doing what Eddie would have said was his duty and nothingWe have diluted that honorific to the point that we have nothing to use to designate the people that really deserve it Eddie fought in a war in a machine of unproven design, utility, or safety and without regard for his safety He did thissuccessfully than any other pilot that survived and survival alone was an accomplishment of significance He then built a career in aviation far beyond what might have been possible for somebody of his almost minimal education If that wasn t enough he survives 3 weeks abandoned in a rubber raft in Pacific without water or food He does all of this because he was both lucky and because he was tenacious in holding on to life and reaching his goals Maybe I didn t miss anything in this book after all Maybe I just needed to think about it a littleI think I will give this book 4 stars


  6. says:

    This biography of Eddie Rickenbacker spends a great deal of time in World War I, since that is where he became the United States greatest Ace as far as number of enemy killed However, the first section deals primarily with is childhood and his years in the auto industry and as a automobile racer, and in the last section there is a chapter about his harrowing three weeks on a life raft adrift in the Pacific with seven others during World War II.Did I love this No, but then I am not fond of des This biography of Eddie Rickenbacker spends a great deal of time in World War I, since that is where he became the United States greatest Ace as far as number of enemy killed However, the first section deals primarily with is childhood and his years in the auto industry and as a automobile racer, and in the last section there is a chapter about his harrowing three weeks on a life raft adrift in the Pacific with seven others during World War II.Did I love this No, but then I am not fond of descriptions of battle nor of descriptions of developing machines, so this is no sleight at the author who has done a good job This book straightens things out quite a bit from the grossly exaggerated books which were published during Eddie s lifetime If you are interested in these subjects, then this is most definitely a book for you


  7. says:

    Eddie Rickenbacker, for me, has always been one of those names from 20th century history that I had heard of and even knew a tiny bit about but not muchI knew he was an American flying Ace from World War I and generally well regarded but have long wished to knowabout him, his life and the times he lived in.General George S Patton famously said, Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by men It is the spirit of the men who follow and of the man who leads that gains the v Eddie Rickenbacker, for me, has always been one of those names from 20th century history that I had heard of and even knew a tiny bit about but not muchI knew he was an American flying Ace from World War I and generally well regarded but have long wished to knowabout him, his life and the times he lived in.General George S Patton famously said, Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by men It is the spirit of the men who follow and of the man who leads that gains the victory He was talking about leaders like Rickenbacker, America s leading ace of WWI with 26 kills The story of how he got there is simply incredible From an adventurous youth demonstrating a genius for machines and mechanics to becoming a renowned race car driver racing in the very first Indy 500 , to becoming America s Ace of Aces pilot in WWI, his story reads like one of those thriller novels where the hero constantly encounters incredible danger but always survives It s so refreshing to read of a person who actually lives up to the hype of history and who learns from his plentiful mistakes throughout his life This quote from him sums it up I ve cheated the Grim Reapertimes than anyone I know, and I ll fight like a wildcat until they nail the lid of my pine box down on me Most of the book is devoted to the two main eras of Rickenbacker s life his car racing career and his WWI successes Less is devoted to his post war career even though that is pretty phenomenal as well starting up Rickenbacker Motor Company , buying and managing the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, clashes with FDR over policy, and a lengthy stint as the leader and eventual owner of Eastern Airlines There are a couple of nicely done chapters on his near fatal airplane crash in 1941 as well as his most famous near death experience, 24 days adrift at sea after a plane that he was a passenger in got lost over the Pacific and had to set down in the middle of the ocean.I would add that this book is aboutthan just the life of Eddie Rickenbacker The title is entirely appropriate in that it is about the times and events and the people that surrounded Rickenbacker during his extraordinary life These men had what it takes or what later generations would refer to as the right stuff It s an amazing story and is definitely an example of how true life can beincredible than fiction.Biographies tend to fall into one of two categories They are either lengthy and filled with every conceivable detail and really meant for a serious scholar of that individual, or they aresuccinct and serve to introduce a reader to the individual This book lies in between There is quite a bit of detail but not so much as to bog it down I commend the author for finding that balance between too much detail and too much surfing over the events and issues of the time Highly recommended


  8. says:

    The story of Eddie Rickenbacker who starts out as a trouble boy with an abusive father He pulled himself to the attention of the of various engineers and became an early driver in the embryo racing circuits of the US When the first war broke out and the US belatedly joined the fight in 1917, Eddie forces his way into the air service flying the french Neiport fighter His time at the front was limited to about 5 months and in that time he became a fighter Ace He joins Eastern Airline and is in The story of Eddie Rickenbacker who starts out as a trouble boy with an abusive father He pulled himself to the attention of the of various engineers and became an early driver in the embryo racing circuits of the US When the first war broke out and the US belatedly joined the fight in 1917, Eddie forces his way into the air service flying the french Neiport fighter His time at the front was limited to about 5 months and in that time he became a fighter Ace He joins Eastern Airline and is injured in a crash while travelling as a passenger and in the second war he was adrift for three weeks in the pacific ocean.The writing is at times flowery trying to embellish the story and gloss the image of the man, who may well have been difficult to understand and certainly had sexist views He did not want any air hostesses in his airline However this book does give some insight into the courage of the early racers and pilots.3 stars


  9. says:

    I recall hearing about Eddie Rickenbacker way back when I was a kid I knew that he was the highest scoring American ace of The Great War and that he had been a race car driver As a fan of the Indianapolis 500, I knew that he had once owned the speedway and sold it to Tony Hulman following World War Two That was about the extent of my knowledge of the man and his deeds In retrospect, I find it amazing that I never thought to readabout him considering my love of racing and of military hi I recall hearing about Eddie Rickenbacker way back when I was a kid I knew that he was the highest scoring American ace of The Great War and that he had been a race car driver As a fan of the Indianapolis 500, I knew that he had once owned the speedway and sold it to Tony Hulman following World War Two That was about the extent of my knowledge of the man and his deeds In retrospect, I find it amazing that I never thought to readabout him considering my love of racing and of military history This book is not a detailed biography of Rickenbacker s entire life, but, as the title indicates, is mostly centered on his racing and his war experiences Ross sets up the biography in the usual way, starting with Rickenbacker s difficult childhood After his father s death, he quit school and became the breadwinner for the family His mechanical aptitude stood him in good stead and he eventually went to work in the automotive industry At the time, racing was seen by the automobile manufacturers as a method of testing car designs and also impressing prospective customers with a hopefully race winning automobile Rickenbacker proved a natural behind the wheel and managed not only to stay alive, which was no small feat in itself, but win races against the big name drivers of the day such as Barney Oldfield and Dario Resta Rickenbacker ran the Indianapolis 500 from 1912 through 1916 Though he never won there, he did show reasonably well He was best on the dirt tracks, though, and it was on those tracks where the bulk of his wins came Both the automobiles and airplanes of the period were finicky, unreliable machines and his mechanical acumen was a great advantage for him Not surprisingly for a man like this, he became interested in aircraft His interest was further piqued when he raced against stunt flyer Lincoln Beachy, car against airplane When the United States entered the war in 1917, he was unable to enlist in the Air Service, but because of his reputation as a race driver and mechanic was assigned as the chauffeur for General Pershing Although a noncom, he had access to both Pershing and Billy Mitchell He used these connections to gain entry to the Air Service The rest, as they say, is history What struck me most was just how incredibly dangerous was the job of these pilots during The Great War I know that I had read that before, but I don t think I really realized just how deadly it really was This book certainly pressed that fact home many times Ross s descriptions of the air combat of the period were excellent and exciting Following the war, Rickenbacker continued to have brushes with death Once in an airline crash and then again when the plane in which he was a passenger got lost at sea and was forced to ditch Eddie and the plane s crew managed to survive 3 weeks in rubber rafts at sea In both cases he was written off as dead, but somehow managed to pull through Rickenbacker was a survivor I found Ross style to be enjoyable and easily read He weaves an exciting tale of the legendary, one of a kind figure that was Eddie Rickenbacker Ross definitely delivers on what the title of the book promises This is truly a story of enduring courage I am really glad that I read it I think that this book would appeal to any history buff Rickenbacker definitely deserves to be remembered Clearly, he was a great man


  10. says:

    Who doesn t know the name Eddie Rickenbacker And now for the man and story behind the name John F Ross has put together a biography that you couldn t make up if you tried And not only Rickenbacker, the book touches on so many of the men during the early days of the automobile and airplane whose exploits were truly living life on the edge A journalist, in writing of the early world of race car driving, described the drivers as men who had spent so much time right up against the wall of dest Who doesn t know the name Eddie Rickenbacker And now for the man and story behind the name John F Ross has put together a biography that you couldn t make up if you tried And not only Rickenbacker, the book touches on so many of the men during the early days of the automobile and airplane whose exploits were truly living life on the edge A journalist, in writing of the early world of race car driving, described the drivers as men who had spent so much time right up against the wall of destruction, seeking to push the limit without going over it, that all had gained a nodding acquaintance with death For Rickenbacker the daring and courage continued as he became America s first flying ace in World War I and went on to endure a harrowing three week ordeal adrift without food or water in the Pacific during World War II Rickenbacker is truly an unforgettable name in American history

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